Trump Sticks With ‘Both Sides’ View on Charlottesville: ‘Trump May Have a Point’

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Donald Trump Tim Scott, Donald Trump Charlottesville, Donald Trump both sidesGetty

President Donald Trump on September 14.

On his way back from a visit to Florida, President Donald Trump spoke with reporters on Air Force One and stuck with his controversial view that “both sides” were responsible for the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia last month. Trump cited violence involving the “Antifa” group, adding “A lot of people are saying and people have actually written, ‘Gee, Trump may have a point.’”

Trump was asked about his Wednesday meeting with South Carolina Senator Tim Scott, the only African American Republican in the U.S. Senate. He said it was a “great talk” and he supports Scott’s legislation to “get people into certain areas and building and constructing and putting people to work. I told him yesterday that’s a concept I can support very easily.”

However, Trump once again stood by his view that there were protesters on “both sides” who deserve the blame for Charlottesville.

“I think especially in light of the advent of Antifa, if you look at what’s going on there. You have some pretty bad dudes on the other side also and essentially that’s what I said,” Trump said Thursday. “Now because of what’s happened since then with Antifa. When you look at really what’s happened since Charlottesville, a lot of people are saying and people have actually written, ‘Gee, Trump may have a point.’ I said there’s some very bad people on the other side also.”