‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Trailer Scenes Didn’t Make the Final Movie

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Spider-Man: Homecoming deleted scenes, Spider-Man Homecoming cut scenes, Spider-Man Homecoming trailersMarvel/YouTube

This shot from the trailers did not make the final film.

Spider-Man: Homecoming is another movie in the growing list to include scenes in trailers that didn’t make the final cut seen in theaters. The trailers, right up until the third one released in May, include two shots that didn’t make the final movie.

Spoilers Follow

In the first shot, seen above, Spider-Man (Tom Holland) and Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) look like best friends, as they swing through Queens. The scene was not in the movie, and likely included in trailers just to further confirm to the general public that Homecoming is part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Spider-Man Homecoming deleted scenes, Spider-Man Homecoming cut scenes, Spider-Man Homecoming trailers

Marvel/YouTubeThis menacing shot of the Vulture also did not make it into the movie.

The second shot is a menacing image of The Vulture/Adrian Toomes (Michael Keaton) that didn’t make the final cut. The scene shows the Vulture swooping down in a hotel rotunda, similar to the hotel Peter and his friends stay at in Washington D.C. However, the Vulture wasn’t seen then.

In an interview with ScreenCrush, director Jon Watts said the scenes were never meant to be seen in the film. However, the Vulture scene is sort of in the movie. Watts originally created the scene for a “sizzle reel” shown at San Diego Comic-Con. He later used the angle for the Vulture’s big reveal in Homecoming, but he changed the setting. Watts told ScreenCrush that the Iron-Man and Spidey scene in Queens was never in the movie.

Watts told the site that the Iron-Man/Spidey scene was a request from Sony. They wanted a shot showing the two characters together in the film and were planning to use a shot from the Staten Island Ferry scene.

“but it just didn’t look that great — the background plate, because the Staten Island terminal is a very simple building. It almost looks like an unrendered 3D object. So I think I was like, ‘Let’s just put them in Queens. Let’s use that as a backdrop,’” Watts told ScreenCrush. “Because we couldn’t just create a whole new shot, so let’s just use one of these shots of the subway; put them in there.”

Audiences have been made more aware of scenes in trailers that didn’t make the final cut of a movie after Rogue One: A Star Wars Story‘s trailers included several shots that weren’t in the movie. There are plenty of other cases from film history where this has happened, but Rogue One underwent extensive changes after its trailers were released, making the deleted scenes more apparent. The trailers for Pixar’s early films were also not even scenes from the films, but specially created shorts to tease the premise.