Hurricane Irma Maps: Latest Path & Tracks for the Storm in Florida & Georgia

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National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Irma continues on its path to the U.S. mainland coast, with Florida squarely within its crosshairs according to the most recent projected paths. The storm is predicted to be near the southern Florida peninsula by Sunday morning and may re-strengthen to a Category 5 before it makes landfall. Tropical storm winds extend far outside the hurricane, so Florida can expect to start feeling the effects of the hurricane sooner on Saturday.

The map above shows a cone estimating the probable path of the center of Irma. It does not reflect the size of the storm, and hazardous conditions may be felt outside of this cone. The hurricane warnings are in red above, and tropical storm warnings are in blue. Hurricane watches are in pink and tropical storm watches are in yellow.

Here’s an experimental map showing when tropical storm force winds will be felt. As you can see from the map, southernmost Florida will begin feeling tropical storm force winds Saturday morning. Georgia can expect to start feeling tropical storm force winds on Sunday night.

National Hurricane Center

Wind speed probabilities can be viewed in this map:

National Hurricane Center

The wind speeds you’re seeing to the right are from Hurricane Jose. These probabilities are for 2 p.m. Eastern Friday through 2 p.m. Eastern Wednesday.

Next is the most current map from the National Hurricane Center estimating where the center of the hurricane will go. As you can see, they are currently tracking it to the western side of Florida, west of Miami, But this can change quickly at any time, and because of the size of the hurricane, many areas will feel hurricane winds even if the eye doesn’t pass over:

National Hurricane Center

You might also be interested in seeing rainfall potential maps for Irma, from the National Hurricane Center. This map below estimates rainfall potential from Friday evening through Wednesday at 8 p.m. Eastern. According to this latest estimate, the southernmost part of the Florida peninsula is estimated to get 10 to 15 inches in that time period:

National Hurricane Center

Next is the Dvorak satellite view of Irma, which shows that Irma appears to be intensifying again:

Unfortunately, the GOES-16 loop also shows possible intensifying:

And the latest recon estimates of surface winds for Irma’s northern eyewall show it may have a chance at strengthening into a Category 5 again:

Here you can see the path of Irma since it formed, from NASA’s CloudSat:

More maps of Irma:

Watch Irma live with these videos below: